#TravelTuesday: Finding Inspiration in Desert Hot Springs

Natural Hot Springs at Miracle Springs Resort

Natural Hot Springs at Miracle Springs Resort

The pools are open 24/7

The pools are open 24/7

Try Capri Restaurant located inside Miracle Springs Resort.

Try Capri Restaurant located inside Miracle Springs Resort.

Cabot's Museum in Desert Hot Springs was both fascinating and inspiring!

Cabot’s Museum in Desert Hot Springs was both fascinating and inspiring!

Waokiye" (Y oh kee ay), means "Traditional Helper" in the Lakota Sioux language. Created by artist Peter "Wolf" Toth.

This is “Waokiye,” which means “Traditional Helper” in the Lakota Sioux language. Created by artist Peter “Wolf” Toth.

cabots-museum-shed-photo by Marcie Taylor

The Hopi-inspired structure is hand-made, created from reclaimed and found materials Cabot was inspired as a young boy when he first saw a replica of a Southwest Indian pueblo at the Chicago World’s Fair.

The Hopi-inspired structure is hand-made, created from reclaimed and found materials Cabot was inspired as a young boy when he first saw a replica of a Southwest Indian pueblo at the Chicago World’s Fair.

We drive along Palm Drive in Desert Hot Springs, away from the glamour of our usual Palm Springs and Rancho Mirage getaway destinations. We feel the heat of the summer sun even with the air conditioner blasting. We notice that there are churches of one kind or another almost at every corner. Finally, we reach our destination: Miracle Springs Resort and Spa.

The first thing that strikes us is that it is on the older side of things but it seems welcoming enough. We’re here for the famous Hot Springs,which according to their website is, “ the only place in the world with both hot and cold mineral spring aquifers.”

It is a balmy afternoon and there isn’t much else to do at the hotel except to hit the pools!
Miracle Springs Resort is known for its natural hot spring mineral waters with their therapeutic, healing properties. The waters rise at an average 140°F from underground lakes, called aquifers, located about 300 feet down. And then the water is then cooled to temperatures ranging from 90°F to 104°F and pumped at 200 gallons per minute into our eight pools and spas; perfect for swimming, soaking, and relaxing.

The waters are indeed relaxing but the pool tiles a little old and could benefit from some sprucing up. Another feature of the resort is its spa. Unfortunately, the place was pretty booked when we were there so I was unable to try out any of their treatments. I did tour the spa too and while the decor looks a bit dated, I have read good reviews about their services.

Perhaps the highlight of our trip was our visit to the nearby Cabot’s Museum. The pueblo sits against a hillside in scenic Desert Hot Springs. This extraordinary pueblo was built with repurposed materials collected throughout the desert and spreads an impressive 5,000 square feet, divided into 35 rooms, with 150 windows and 65 doors. Talk about a green eco-friendly building! What was truly impressive was the story of Cabot the Man — Cabot Yerxa, who was a visionary, artist, writer, builder, architect, explorer and entrepreneur. How have we never heard of him? My boys and I endured the oppressive heat during the tour because we were so fascinated by this man’s story and ingenuity!

After a morning spent touring the grounds at Cabot’s, we return to Miracle Springs for a hearty brunch at the resort’s in-house restaurant, Capri. We enjoy a hearty and tasty breakfast. With our tummies full, our bodies relaxed and our minds inspired, we leave Desert Hot Springs, rejuvenated.

To learn more about Miracle Springs, visit miraclesprings.com and to get more information about Cabot’s Museum, visit cabotsmuseum.orgi

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